By Paul Liggins

The moral of the story: if you've just finished a hard run, gasping for breath and not thinking straight, and Gary Carroll approaches, walk away as fast as you possibly can.

And theyre off kunanyi kapers

When Gary asked if I was interested in helping with a rogaine, my oxygen-depleted brain thought (a) I've done about a dozen rogaines so (b)  its about time I did my bit and (c) its a long way off so there's plenty of time and anyway (d) how hard can it be?  Thus, somewhat rashly I said yes, immediately recognising my error when I saw the look of surprise in Gary's eyes.

Gary applied his skills of the dark arts and magically came up with a base map. I applied my special skill, procrastinating, leaving it to Easter to do map refinement and corrections.  Then two days before Easter I hurt my back and  spent all my allotted mapping and course setting time lying on the floor watching Fox Sports.

By Allan Hood

Tom, Mick and myself teamed up for the recent 6 hour rogaine, held in perfect - even warm ? - autumn weather. 

Overall winner Allan Hood collecting prize on behalf of his team kunanyi kapers

We had initially planned a clockwise loop going to Fern Tree first, but the lure of big points in Sandy Bay as well as faster terrain, prompted us to start with Mount Nelson and continue in a large anti-clockwise loop, giving lots of zig zag options back through the Waterworks and Ridgeway.

Our first hour netted a good 8 controls for 330 points, and just on 10km covered (downhill assisted!) as we made our way back onto Churchill Avenue.

The nostalgia I had felt about returning to Bangor after events in ‘98 and ‘03 had nearly entirely evaporated as I stepped on or near my tenth snake for the day with no water left, and another five checkpoints to hang. The beauty of the northern farmland and the beaches a distant memory as I pushed on through the scrub in the south. Looking at the map on the kitchen table it all seemed so straight forward…

Ron Frederick (L) and Don Baker (R) planning.
Ron Frederick (L) and Don Baker (R) planning.

… a Metrogaine where everyone learned more about Hobart Town.

… by organiser Mark Hey …

After a wet day prior, it thankfully dawned blue skies on Saturday 28th July 2018 for a Metrogaine around Upper Sandy Bay and Battery Point where the clues were about the names of houses, the history of the area, and the accessible public art.

Home base was the hall of 10th Hobart Scouts in Marieville Esplanade where most of the 111 participants in 44 Teams could be seen sitting outside in the sun by the river on a still morning doing their route planning.

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An unusual aspect of the event was a self managed 15 minute obligatory break for all Teams to be taken between noon and 1 pm which would allow everyone to enjoy one of the many cafes on the course without the pressure to keep going. Jackman and McRoss Bakery in Hampden Road was favoured by a few Teams.

By Hugh Fitzgerald

Initially planned to be a 24 hour event, a mix of thick scrub and limited land access saw the Run Rheban Run Rogaine trimmed down to 6 and 12 hour events. Confronted with such a small map, we decided to infill the area with controls. This had two benefits: it increased course planning decisions (gratifying for setters) and made many legs to nearest control less than 1 km (gratifying for competitors). The final map excluded the worst areas of scrub, but there were still minor patches here and there. Inevitably, a few teams came in with vegetation horror stories.

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There were 117 entrants in the event, with an unusual distribution of 31 teams in the 6-hour and only 19 teams in the 12-hour. All teams were off at 11 am, at which point the organisers started eyeing off all the wine and chocolate lying about. Some thought was put into replenishing water drops, preparing a bonfire for after dark (thanks to Mick Cooper), and patting the friendly dogs from down the road.

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